MAY EDIT
 

This month’s edit is here and it’s all about warm, natural hues. As the weather gets cooler it’s nice to have some pieces in your home that bring the cosiness up a notch. Lot’s of texture, warmer tones and crisp, fresh whites will keep your space feeling warm and inviting through the colder months. Here are my picks to bring the heat this winter.

May Edit.jpg
 
OBJECT UNION AT THE EMPIRE
 

When your friend, who just happens to be one of the best interior stylists in town, asks if she can loan product from your new store for one of her projects, you just say yes. Jo Carmichael is an Interior Designer / Stylist who has worked with some of the biggest design magazines in the world including British Homes and Gardens, Vogue Living, and Marie Claire.

The project in question was styling The Empire, a stunning home renovation in City Beach by boutique Perth Building Designer Dalecki Design. Photographed by the incredible architecture and interior photographer Dion Robeson. Put these masters of their craft together and you get pure magic. I can’t tell you how happy it makes me to see OU pieces in this stunning home.

Image by  Dion Robeson  | Styling by  Jo Carmichael

Image by Dion Robeson | Styling by Jo Carmichael

Image by  Dion Robeson  | Styling by  Jo Carmichael

Image by Dion Robeson | Styling by Jo Carmichael

Image by   Dion Robeson   | Styling by  Jo Carmichael

Image by Dion Robeson | Styling by Jo Carmichael

ADA CUSHION
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MAHLIA CUSHION
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ANURAK CUSHION
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ALANG CUSHION IN CORAL
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BAHRU LEATHER CUSHION IN TAN
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Image by  Dion Robeson  | Styling by  Jo Carmichael

Image by Dion Robeson | Styling by Jo Carmichael

KADIA CUSHION
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Image by  Dion Robeson  | Styling by  Jo Carmichael

Image by Dion Robeson | Styling by Jo Carmichael

Image by  Dion Robeson  | Styling by  Jo Carmichael

Image by Dion Robeson | Styling by Jo Carmichael

LARGE SERVING BOWL LIGHT
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LARGE TRAY IN MAPLE
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Image by  Dion Robeson  | Styling by  Jo Carmichael

Image by Dion Robeson | Styling by Jo Carmichael

 
A GUIDE TO DISPLAYING ART IN YOUR HOME
 

Hanging art in your home is one of the easiest ways to inject your personality into a space, and also makes a place feel more lived in.  Knowing how to display artwork so it looks ‘right’ can be tricky, but there are a few things you can keep in mind that will make it a little easier. Of course, it’s your home and you can do whatever you damn well please, but these are just guides to help anyone who feels like they have no idea where to start and could use a few pointers before committing to drilling into walls.

 

The most obvious place to start is where to hang art. I’m talking location, we’ll get to height and spacing and all that in a minute. If you’re like me, you don’t always have a place in mind when you buy a piece of artwork so you just have to figure out when you get home.  Unless you like the cluttered look, my first piece of advice is that you don’t need to fill every bit of available wall space up with artwork. If you have more artwork than you do wall space you can group it together on one wall. Bare walls give your eyes a place to rest and can make just as much impact as a wall covered in beautiful art. As a general rule hanging art or one or two walls in a room is enough, not including open living spaces. 

 As far as which rooms to hang it in, don’t forget to give some love to those less lived in rooms.  The kitchen, laundry, bathroom, even the good old water closet can benefit from a little something up on the walls.  Consider placing artwork in unexpected places too, like on a nightstand in the bedroom, in a kitchen scullery, or even on the floor, leaning up against the wall. Take these ideas and experiment in your home to see what looks best to you. 

Interior Design by Alexander Design | www.alexanderdb.com

Interior Design by Alexander Design | www.alexanderdb.com

Once you’ve nailed down where you want to hang your artwork there’s more things to take into consideration.

 

HEIGHT

When you are hanging art on a bare wall by itself, and by that, I mean with no furniture underneath it, the rule is to hang theartwork so that the centre of it is at eye level, 145 – 150cm from the ground.  There are exceptions to this rule if your ceiling height is really tall you can hang art higher, or if the ceiling is low. Or depending on your height. If you are a tall or short family, hang your art at your eye height, it’s your house after all.

 

When you are hanging a row of artwork that is different heights, align in the centre not the top or the bottom. Even when you take all the art around the room into account, keep all artwork aligned in centre for a more cohesive look. If want to display your art vertically by stacking two or more pieces on top of each other, look at the pieces as a whole and hang the middle of the collection at eye level, unless the peices are quite large and then I would place the top piece at eye level and hang the rest below.

 

HANGING ARTWORK OVER FURNITURE

When you want to hang artwork over furniture throw they eye level rule out the window. In this case it looks better if the art and furniture relate to each other. You achieve this by hanging the artwork about 10 – 20cm above the furniture, this will connect them. This works for large pieces over a bed or sofa, but where art is placed over a low sideboard and hanging it 20cm above would leave it sitting too low, you can follow the eye level rule and connect the pieces in a different way. Placing a vase flowers, or some other tall décor piece will connect the elements visually.

 

The width of artwork should be about two thirds the width of the furniture , never wider than the furniture. You can also centre artwork between two pieces of furniture to connect them visually. 

Interior Design by Amber Interiors | Image by Tessa Neustadt

Interior Design by Amber Interiors | Image by Tessa Neustadt

GROUPING ARTWORK

One of the biggest mistakes I see when people hang art in there homes is when they hang a set of pieces too far apart. When hanging a collection of artwork they should only be about 6 – 8cm apart. Please, for the love of all that is good in the world, don’t try to spread them out to cover the entire wall. This just ends up looking odd. Treat the pieces as if they were one piece and keep them together. Trust me.

 

 CONSIDER OTHER ELEMENTS IN THE ROOM

Furniture isn’t the only element of a room that needs to be taken into account when hanging your artwork. How you move around your house and which walls are visable from different angles will help guide you in finding the best place to hang artwork. For example if you happen to have a blank wall at the end of a long hallway this is a perfect place to hang something you love. You could choose to hang art under the stairs and organise images in a stair pattern to mimic the line of the stairs. Sometimes windows can help to balance a piece of art hung asymmetrically.

 

Keep in mind the function of the room too. You don’t want to hang a piece of art where a door is going to open and hit it, or hang a piece too close to a window only to draw the curtain back and cover your beautiful artwork.

 

Home of Karen Maj Kornum | Image by Jonas Lundberg

Home of Karen Maj Kornum | Image by Jonas Lundberg

PLAY WITH SCALE 

The scale of the artwork in relation to the room, or the wall it’s going is important to think about. Too small and your artwork can look looks lost, too big and it can look out of place. (think artwork that has no wall space on the sides, or apiece that is way bigger than the furniture piece it sits above) If you’re ever in doubt it’s best to have something that is a little too big than a little too small. If you want to create interest place an artwork that is deliberately out of scale, but this can be tricky to get right if you don’t know what you’re doing. 

 

If you want a smaller piece on a larger wall you can add a matt board and a larger frame to fill the wall. If you have lot’sof small pieces of art you can consider grouping them together to cover a larger space, or you can frame a smaller piece with wide matt board and a larger frame so it appears bigger. 

Home of Julia Hunter | Image by Brian Merriam

Home of Julia Hunter | Image by Brian Merriam

DIFFERENT WAYS TO HANG ARTWORK 

As with anything in your home it’s all about experimenting and figuring out what works best for you. There’s lots of options for displaying artwork that you can try to take your space to the next level. 

 

OVERSIZED

If you have a large area of wall and nothing on it, consider looking for an oversized piece formaximum impact. We’re talking almost floor to ceiling. Go big or go home.

 

PICTURE LEDGE

Picture ledges are great because you can change up your display whenever you like. You can even use them to display books as art is a really great option in a kids room, or an office.

 

GRID

If you have a collection of art that is all the same size a grid wall is a great option. The uniform layout creates a striking focal point in any room.

Interior by Leclair Decor

Interior by Leclair Decor

GALLERY WALL

If you have a big collection of artworks of different sizes, or even shapes, a gallery wall is a great option. Group your collection together in a random but cohesive display to create a beautiful display of your artwork. Don’t forget to keep everything about 4-6cm apart and place the larger images first to round the collection. A great tip here is to plan the arrangement on the floor first to make sure it works, alternatively you can cut out paper the same size as your art and then tape them to the wall to work out where everything should go.

 

LEAN

Leaning artwork against the wall is a really great option. It works for really large pieces, or small pieces on a shelf or mantle. You can also lean art pieces in front of each other to add depth. (see picture above)

FRONT AND CENTRE

This one is obvious and probably the most common style. A large print or painting centred over a bed, mantle, sofa or other furniture. This always looks great and is hard to get wrong.

 

STACKED

Rather than hanging artwork in a row horizontally, try hanging it vertically. This is a good option when you have pieces that are different shapes, like a clock over a rectangle frame. This style also looks good when you create a vignette with a low piece of furniture, like a chair.

 

ASYMMETRIC

Change it up a little and hang your artwork off centre. This creates an interesting and more dynamic look. A popular look right now is to hang art over nightstand instead of centred over the bed.

If I’ve missed anything, or you have a more specific question about hanging artwork in your home hit up in the comments, I’m happy to help.

We have a big range of stunning photographic prints available here at Object Union, all from local Perth artists. If you’re inspired to get more goodness on your walls, you can check them out here.

 
PALM 5 BY DENISE RIX
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TROPEA, ITALY BY RHIANNA MAY
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HIGHLAND COWS, FINLAND BY PEGGY SAAS
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TOM'S SURF BREAK 1, WESTERN AUSTRALIA BY DENISE RIX
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ARTISAN SERIES | BAHRU LEATHER
 

One of the things that draws me to the products I select for Object Union, apart from how ridiculously beautiful they are, is the story behind them. So, I wanted to start an artisan series on the journal to share some of those stories with you.  It’s a complete no brainer to kick off the series with one of my favourite local brands Bahru Leather.

 

Bahru is a brand of beautiful accessories and homewares with a focus on functionality and style, made from the most amazing quality leather, and designed right here in WA.  Bahru offers a range of timeless and practical bags for all occasions. From larger every day bags to smaller designs for a night on the town with every bag designed to be super stylish and practical, and let me tell you they last For. Ever. They also have a range of stunning cushions in the most beautiful colours you’ve ever seen which we are lucky enough to stock in our store.

 

Bahru is the brainchild of brand manager turned accessories designer slash business lady Fliss Brophy. I met Fliss a few years ago when she approached me to style a campaign for Bahru, and we instantly clicked. She is down to earth, talented, and honestly one of the nicest people you will ever meet. As for Bahru, the brand is a wonderful as the boss lady herself, and Fliss works tirelessly to nurture her brand, you’ll often find her at markets meeting her customers, or working with retail clients to bring the brand to new audiences. All while being wife and mother to three young babes, and renovating their family home. Talk about real life super hero.

 

Fliss and Mozzie at her Studio | Image by  Abbie Melle

Fliss and Mozzie at her Studio | Image by Abbie Melle

The Bahru Studio | Image by  Abbie Melle

The Bahru Studio | Image by Abbie Melle

Studio details | Image by  Abbie Melle

Studio details | Image by Abbie Melle

Bahru started as what Fliss calls a ‘fun little project’ around 2007. She and her husband were living in Singapore at the time and Fliss was at home with her first child, having not returned to work after he was born. Noticing a gap in the market between high end designer bags, and cheap, mass produced options, she started playing around with her own designs.  She had a few pieces made and tested the waters with some friends, who loved them so much they became paying customers and Fliss realised she was onto something.  Little by little the ‘fun project’ turned into a fully-fledged business and Bahru was born. 

 

For those curious minds out there, Bahru means ‘new’ in Malay a word Fliss noticed everywhere and fell in love with when she first moved to Singapore. It wasn’t until later she found out the meaning of the word, and lucky for her it totally suited her brand in both languages.

 

Fliss and her family are now happily settled back on the family farm where she grew up in the South west of WA. ‘My grandfather came here to farm in 1936 when he was 21 years old and my dad also grew up here.  When I was younger we had beef cattle and a dairy, now it’s solely beef cattle and the farm is run in conjunction with my brother’s farm which is 3 hours north of Perth.  This is a particularly favourite time of the year as all the calves are being born.  This morning there were 18 - tomorrow who knows!  It’s a beautiful place to bring up our kids and a great place to work from.  Our offices are in the Old Stables - a beautiful limestone building built around 1850.’ I mean check out these photos of this amazing space. Total studio envy!

 

Image by  Abbie Melle

Image by Abbie Melle

Image by  Abbie Melle

Image by Abbie Melle

Image by  Abbie Melle

Image by Abbie Melle

The aim with Bahru is always to create ‘beautifully practical’ pieces that look and feel amazing but are also really functional to make life that little bit easier. Fliss says, ‘I think most of the Bahru customers have a very busy life and have their hands full with kids, work and life so their everyday bag should help them when they’re on the go.’  And Fliss nails it every time every single element is carefully considered so the bags are as practical as possible for their intended use.  Almost all of the straps are adjustable so you’re your bag can fit you just right, and there are inside zips for keeping your precious things safe. All of the larger bags have key clips so you’re not forever digging around the bottom for your keys, which is never fun when you have your arms full of grocery bags, and every Bahru bag has a light-coloured lining which allows you to find things in your bag. 

 

All the leather used for Bahru pieces are chosen for their look, feel and colour.  Often it takes a long time to find the right leather.  Fliss searched for the perfect dark navy leather for THREE YEARS before she found the amazing, buttery, French Navy that is in her collection today.  Each leather is hand selected by Fliss and can be quite different, some are smoother whilst others have more of a texture, it all depends on what Fliss sees for the brand.  ‘We have a great supplier who really understands what we are looking for and we both really care about the quality.’

Image by  Abbie Melle

Image by Abbie Melle

Image by  Abbie Melle

Image by Abbie Melle

As for the bags being named after cities of the world, it’s just another element that adds to the endearing story of the brand and the talented lady behind it . ‘We’ve always been big travellers; my husband was an expat kid living in many different countries and I met him while backpacking in Turkey.  We have lived in four different countries together and our three children were born overseas.  Cities of the world seemed to be a good way to distinguish between the different styles.’ Indeed!

 

I am so honoured to have a selection of Bahru pieces available here at Object Union. Check out the bags here and the cushions here. For the whole shebang head to the Bahru website

 
BAHRU ROME IN BLACK
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BAHRU LEATHER CUSHION IN NAVY
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BAHRU LEATHER CUSHION IN TAN
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BAHRU AMSTERDAM IN ARMY
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